Hell Hath No Fury Like My Cashmere Scorned....

So. My disappointment in the quality of sweaters just jumped up a notch today. No, I take it back. It jumped up about seventeen notches. Readers, I give you, Exhibit A:




This is my Equipment cashmere sweater. New season (Fall/Winter 2012). It retails on their website for $288.00. Thankfully, that is nowhere near what I paid for it. I have featured this sweater in a blog post, am absolutely in love with the colour, and was hoping that it would become a part of my forever pile that would gracefully age along with the other cashmere pieces in my collection. I have worn this sweater for a full day about five or six times, and only travelled with it once. Take note of the thinness of the weave. The pilling. The unstable-looking seaming. Now witness Exihibit B:




You will recognize this as the sweater that I featured in this past week's post. This is a sweater by Charter Club, Macy's brand of cashmere. This is a sweater that I got secondhand on Ebay. These days, I think that they run a little over a hundred bucks new, but you can pretty reliably get them on sale. I have no idea how old this sweater is, but I do know that I am not its first owner. Witness the denser weave of this sweater,  the lack of any significant pilling. I have worn this to death. It has been to the Alps (twice), to the USA (three times) and all over the UK. Although I can't be sure when this was made, I think its safe to say that this sweater has the upper hand in the quality of cashmere department.


Designers and Retailers,
What the hell!?
You are shooting yourselves in the foot. You might get someone to pay a ridiculously-inflated price for an inferior-quality garment once. Once. But it doesn't take a rocket scientist to see that you are sourcing your materials and labor on the cheap. I strongly suggest you rethink your production quality if you want to charge these kinds of prices. Otherwise, it is in your best interest to sharpen your friggin' pencils and start charging for what you are actually producing, and not for what you think you can make the customer believe you are producing.  Best of luck Equipment, but I'm afraid this relationship is just not working out. It's not me, it's you.

Highland Fashionista

Comments

  1. There seems to be no rhyme nor reason to it--I've got cashmere sweaters from Neimans and some fancy "Scottish" brands that develop new holes every time I look at them, and some from Old Navy/Valerie Stevens/Charter Club that could probably survive a cat 3 hurricane. Like you, I purchase a lot of mine secondhand (who sells their cashmere anyway, People Who Can't Hand Wash?) so if something isn't fabulous at least I didn't pay anywhere near retail for it. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  2. I so agree with you. My best cashmeres are the ones I get at my consignment shop. I have no idea why someone would sell a perfect sweater that is in perfect shape. I am so lucky to have found several there in the past few years and I have not paid more then $20!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I'm loving the quality and color of the sweater I bought from you. I'll have to send a pic.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm so glad! I loved that cardigan too but alas it never quite fit me right. I'm glad that these pieces go to good homes. That's why I have the shop :)

      Delete
  4. yikes, that's no good! i can't believe a reputable brand like equipment would have such poor quality.

    PS-check out my blog to enter my Jack Rogers giveaway!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know, and I will definitely check out the Jack Rogers....my hot pink ones are on their last legs....

      Delete
  5. That is all kinds of crazy! How annoying. I stopped buying cashmere-anything from J.Crew 3 years ago due to excessive pilling. So pointless. Love the Brooks Brothers line though!

    ReplyDelete
  6. wow, good that I came across this post as I was on the verge of purchasing a sweater. I think Equipment is flying a bit too high on the reputation they built on their silk blouses...

    ReplyDelete
  7. Indeed. I would try Brora...pricier, but nice...and Scottish :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. I've just read through the blog and i think it's a tad unfair, you are not comparing like for like. The garment in picture A looks to be knitted 'out of gauge' i.e. knitting a garment but using a finer yarn count to achieve a specific look and weight, this type of garment is never going to last in cashmere. The garment in picture B looks to be knitted in 12gg and using a 2/26's nm yarn count, this type of garment will last many years if carefully worn and washed.

    You also need to regularly wash cashmere knitwear to prevent pilling, cashmere is a naturally short fibre, many people dont wash cashmere as its seen as a luxury fibre, this is completely the wrong thing to do.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    2. Yes, I know I'm not comparing like for like, which is sort of my point. The thinner cashmere cost nearly $300, while the more sturdy version retails between $50 (if you get it end of season) and $150. I would expect any garment to last longer than having been worn 5 times, for only a few hours at a time. I hadn't even gotten to the washing of the sweater part of its lifecycle yet. The point being, that manufacturers are passing-off inferior product quality these days with the same, if not inflated, price tag.

      Delete
  9. You can get very good cashmere at M&S at very reasonable regular prices great colours and look out 4 promos with 20% off & sales.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Deep Thoughts...

Popular Posts